Training Like a Champion -Georges St-Pierre

It’s been a while since my last post…my apologies.  Recently I’ve had MMA on my mind and my TV -more than usual anyway.  The other night I was watching The Ultimate Fighter on Spike and thought that Georges St-Pierre was different than many other cage fighters. He seemed to exude confidence and his calm demeanor is uncommon in the MMA world -so I decided to do some research on him and his training.

“I always train with better wrestlers than me, better boxers than me, better jujitsu guys than me,” Georges St-Pierre says. “When you train with people who are better than you, it keeps challenging you. By challenging me it makes me better. It makes you better develop your skills than someone who is always training with the same people over and over again. I have a very good team.

“Normally, when I don’t have a fight coming up, I always train,” Georges St. Pierre explains. “I train six days a week, two training sessions a day. I box, go the gym and I have a lot of great training partners. I train with guys who are going to the Olympics, and I train with some of the best jujitsu guys in the world. In every type of training I do, I train with better guys than me so I always develop my skills.”I do boxing, wrestling, Muay Thai, jujitsu — that’s the four disciplines that I do. I also do sprinting and strength-conditioning.

“If you want to be a tough MMA fighter, you have to have a background in something. I started with karate, some people are very successful in wrestling, some others in tae kwon do… There isn’t a better style — that’s a lie. There is better person but not a better style. Karate was the perfect sport for me to start with, but maybe for another person it would be kung fu or judo. It all depends on what you love to do. If you’re good at it, it’s because you love what you’re doing.”

Georges St-Pierre continues, “After my first fight with Matt Serra, I was training with one thing in mind: get my revenge. It was the only thing I had in mind. I was not focusing on the guy I was going to fight; I was focusing on getting my revenge against Matt Serra. I was working with a sport psychologist and he said, ‘You haven’t released your brick.’ That’s what he told me. And it was true. I didn’t accept the fact that I had lost. I just wanted to jump in the ring and get my revenge, when in reality I had two fights to go before getting to Matt Serra.

“So, [the psychologist] says to me, ‘You haven’t released your brick.’ He made me grab a brick and he said, ‘Carry a brick for one day and it’s not so bad. At first it’s not heavy. But if you carry it on your back every day, every single minute of your life, it’s going to get heavy. So you better get rid of it and look for what’s important to you.’

“He made me get a brick and I wrote ‘Matt Serra’ on it, and he said, ‘When you are ready to release that brick and look to the future, you’re going to take this brick and throw it into the river.’ It sounds stupid but that’s what I did. I think it helped me to release a lot of the negative energy that I had. Instead of focusing, I kept my eyes off of the goal. So now I’m focused again on the goal. I think this helped me a lot.”

So, who are you training with? -and how many bricks are you carrying?

 

Talk to you soon,
Marco

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